• Rirkrit Tiravanija, untitled 2018 (the infinite dimensions of smallness), 2018 — Ng Teng Fong Roof Garden Commission series
  • Rirkrit Tiravanija, untitled 2018 (the infinite dimensions of smallness), 2018 — Ng Teng Fong Roof Garden Commission series
  • Rirkrit Tiravanija, untitled 2018 (the infinite dimensions of smallness), 2018 — Ng Teng Fong Roof Garden Commission series
  • Rirkrit Tiravanija, untitled 2018 (the infinite dimensions of smallness), 2018 — Ng Teng Fong Roof Garden Commission series
  • Rirkrit Tiravanija, untitled 2018 (the infinite dimensions of smallness), 2018 — Ng Teng Fong Roof Garden Commission series
  • Galileo's Wedge by Beverly Pepper en hiver. Photo de William J Hebert — Frederik Meijer Gardens and Sculpture Park
  • Beverly Pepper, Untitled (Studies for Denver Monoliths 2), 2006
  • Beverly pepper, Untitled (Studies for Denver Monoliths), 2006
  • beverly pepper, Untitled (Study for Spazio Teatro Celle, Gori Foundation), 1992
  • beverly pepper With David Smith, 1962 Spoleto, collection of the artist
  • Karla Black, Easily Asked, 2014 Polythene, powder paint, plaster powder, thread 196×161×143cm Image courtesy of Karla Black and Stuart Shave/Modern Art, London
  • Ugo Rondinone, orange yellow green blue pink red mountain, 2015 Painted stone, stainless steel, plywood, concrete Sculpture, 193 × 46 × 29 cm, Pedestal 15×45×45cm Overall208×46×45cm. Image courtesy of Sadie Coles HQ, London © Ugo Rondinone
  • Mona Hatoum, Doormat II, 2000–2001, Stainless steel and nickel plated pins, glue and canvas 3×72.5×42cm. Courtesy Alexander and Bonin, New York and White Cube. Photo: © Oren Slor. © Mona Hatoum
  • Lee Ufan, Relatum - Stage, 2018 © AECOM © Adagp, Paris, 2018
  • Hammer Projects: Sam Falls, installation view, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, December 16, 2017–April 29, 2018. Photo: Brian Forrest.
  • Sam Falls, Untitled (Hudson, NY, Sumac Tree I), 2014. Pigment on canvas. 138 x 162 ¼ in. (350.5 x 412.1 cm). Courtesy of the artist; Galleria Franco Noero, Turin; Eva Presenhuber, New York and Zurich; and Hannah Hoffman, Los Angeles.
  • Sam Falls, Untitled (Venice, CA, Palm 9), 2014. Pigment on canvas. 98 x 74 in. (249 x 188 cm). Courtesy of the artist; Galleria Franco Noero, Turin; Eva Presenhuber, New York and Zurich; and Hannah Hoffman, Los Angeles.
  • Installation view: The Land We Live In – The Land We Left Behind Hauser & Wirth Somerset, 20 January – 7 May 2018 Courtesy of Hauser & Wirth Photo: Ken Adlard
  • Installation view: The Land We Live In – The Land We Left Behind Hauser & Wirth Somerset, 20 January – 7 May 2018 Courtesy of Hauser & Wirth Photo: Ken Adlard
  • Installation view: The Land We Live In – The Land We Left Behind Hauser & Wirth Somerset, 20 January – 7 May 2018 Courtesy of Hauser & Wirth Photo: Ken Adlard
  • Installation view: The Land We Live In – The Land We Left Behind Hauser & Wirth Somerset, 20 January – 7 May 2018 Courtesy of Hauser & Wirth Photo: Ken Adlard
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February’s Picks

News - 01/02/2018 - Article : Barbara Fecchio

untitled 2018 (the infinite dimensions of smallness)
Rirkrit Tiravanija
National Gallery Singapore — Ng Teng Fong Roof Garden (Singapore, Malaysia)
Argentinian artist Rirkrit Tiravanija has recently installed a giant bamboo maze on the roof of the National Gallery Singapore (Ng Teng Fong Roof Garden), with a teahouse at its center. Visitors are invited to meet inside the maze and – upon reservation – discover the Japanese tea ceremony demonstrated by Japanese tea masters.

Drawn Into Form: Sixty Years of Drawings and Prints by Beverly Pepper
Meijer Sculpture Gardens (Michigan, United States)
A selection of seventy drawings and prints, from the 1950s to today, attests of the wealth and diversity of Beverly Pepper’s work. While this American artist is mostly known for her monumental sculptures, often displayed in public spaces, this exhibition is a great opportunity to (re)discover her work from a new, more intimate and organic perspective.

Entwined
Cristina Iglesias
Marian Goodman Gallery, New York (United States)
Until February 10th, 2018
Marian Goodman Gallery (New York) is presenting an exhibition of Spanish artist Cristina Iglesias’ latest work. Entwined perfectly designates the mesh and interlacing of the vegetal patterns often present in her work. In one of the rooms, patinated aluminum vegetal forms seem to grow out of the gallery’s floor and creep onto its walls; another installation consists of water running through openings in the floor. From one space to the next, the artist invites us to contemplate and imagine what lies beneath the surface, to let ourselves be guided by these invisible spaces and to recover memories faded by time.

ISelf Collection: The Upset Bucket
Whitechapel Gallery, Londres (England)
Until April 1st, 2018
If you are visiting London, do not miss the collective exhibition ISelf Collection: The Upset Bucket at the Whitechapel Gallery. This is an opportunity to see Ugo Rondinone’s orange yellow green blue pink red mountain (2015). This sculpture work precedes the famous Seven Magic Mountains (2016) installed in the Nevada desert between Las Vegas and Los Angeles: seven gigantic thirty to fifty-feet-high columns made of balancing rainbow colored rocks. The exhibition also features monumental and ephemeral sculptures by Scottish artist Karla Black, who uses very delicate materials such as cosmetic powders, cellophane, pigments or cotton to create her installations.

California Flora (National Forest Condensation Wall)
Sam Falls
Hammer Museum, Los Angeles (United States)
Until April 29th, 2018
For his installation on the lobby walls of the Hammer Museum, American artist Sam Falls has explored all of California’s nineteen state forests. Travelling from ocean to desert, volcanic landscapes to woodlands, he brought back numerous plant specimens. The leaves, flowers and branches collected were first placed on large canvases, then sprinkled with colored pigments and finally left outside overnight. Condensation and morning dew allowed pigments to be absorbed by the canvas and resulted in a psychedelic mix of colors. Once the plants were removed, their negative print remained on the colored canvas. Through this very specific process, similar to the photogram, Falls draws a complex portrait of California, made of absence and vivid colors, a vibrant homage to his native state and the incredible wealth and diversity of its flora and of its landscapes.

Untitled : (Global Displacement: nearly 1 in 100 people worldwide are displaced from their homes. Source: http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2016/10/05/key-facts-about-the-worlds-refugees/), 2018.
Judith Barry
Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston (United States)
Until June 26th, 2018
Since the opening of the museum’s new wing designed by Renzo Piano in 2012, the Anne H. Fitzpatrick façade of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston (United States) hosts a new site-specific contemporary artwork every six months. The project’s program, closely linked to the museum’s artists-in-residence program, illustrates the true engagement of the museum in public art. The wall currently displays Judith Barry’s installation, untitled: (Global Displacement: nearly 1 in 100 people worldwide are displaced from their homes. Source: http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2016/10/05/key-facts-about-the-worlds-refugees/), 2018, a photomontage created from drone images of migrants fleeing war or poverty.  

The Land We Live In – The Land We Left Behind
Curated by Adam Sutherland
Hauser & Wirth Somerset, England
Until May 2018
The reflection on what is at stake in today’s rural world is at the core of Grizedale Arts’ (Lawson Park, United Kingdom) Director Adam Sutherland’s research: how to create in the rural space? What is our relation to the earth? How is our perception of the « agricultural » town formed and how does it evolve? Through the work of more than fifty artists, from the 16th century to today, The Land We Live In – The Land We Left Behind attempts to provide answers to these questions.

Lee Ufan, Relatum – Stage (2018)
Serpentine Gallery, London
Starting February 6th, 2018
Since the 1960s, Korean artist Lee Ufan has been working on his series Relatum, in which he always combines a natural material, such as stone, with a manmade material, such as steel. Relatum – Stage (2018) is no exception. Created for the Serpentine Gallery, it will be installed in the royal Kensington Gardens in London on February 6th. The word Relatum, Latin for relation, is referring here to the relationship between the work of art and the environment: an ever-changing, ever-evolving dialogue.

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